Who Gon’ Stop Her, Huh?

This award is important for a few reasons:

It honors someone who is moving like a freight train through Hollywood.
The award is named after a song by Jay-Z and pre-sunken place, Kanye.
I made it up and it’s dope.
Because it’s Women’s History Month, this award is recognizing another Black woman favorite of mine and apparently everyone else. Let’s not ignore the elephant in the room or should I say, the last Black unicorn in the room.

International Women’s Day and the wage gap

Can I be honest?

Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day…just feels so very White to me. I don’t feel nothing…that’s improper grammar right? I don’t feel anything for either of these celebrations. 

Which made me wonder, did any of my teachers out there acknowledge IWD in your classrooms, last week? Have you all been doing anything for Women’s History Month? Do y’all even know the theme for this year IWD, did you know a theme existed?

La Guarachera de Cuba: Celia Cruz

Cruz recast’s Gloria Gaynor’s famous “you’re not welcome anymore,” heartbreak anthem as a song about resilience and joy in the face of trials. The struggle for freedom, the tears for the friends we leave behind, the perseverance and the love for our people that carries us forward. The ancient song, hands on drums and feet dancing, the blood of our villages that we carry across all borders and barriers, into spaces that do not always love us but where we must love in order to survive.

Uplifting Forgotten Mujeres: The Story of Activist & Combatant Yolanda Guzman

After Bosch’s expulsion from the country, Guzmán participated in several protests. She visited jails and brought political prisoners food as well as helped single mothers gain access to sewing machines, milk and bread for their children. She told her mother Doña Beatriz of her plans for the revolution and would often entrust her with preparing and delivering food to political prisoners and revolutionary leaders.

Kemet Queens: Melissa Harville-Lebron

I made a post on Instagram a few weeks back after hearing Chris Rock on his new Netflix special Tambourine, where he said, “only children and women are loved unconditionally; but men are loved based off of what they can provide.” At the time, more than being funny the line felt true and so considered it fair game to repost. That is until I actually wrapped my brain around the saying and started to unpack it that I realized, what he said was complete and utter BS.

What Black History Can Teach Us About the Gender Binary

European colonizers met non-binary people advising kings, and being spiritual leaders, warriors, and court eunuchs among nations and tribes as diverse as the Zulu, Buganda, and Amhara. Christianity and Islam coexisted with women warriors, men with long hair and braids, and women marrying each other for convenience and economic stability. The diaspora is no different; there are many examples from Brazil, Haiti, the U.S., and Cuba where African descendants break our normal expectations of men and women.