Collective Work and Responsibility

Lots of times when I bring up Kwanzaa to my family and friends, they react in one of a few ways:

The sigh: You know the sigh, it’s the: “not this shit again,” sigh. The: “here you go on that Black shit again.” sigh. Or the: “why you trying to take away Christmas from me?” sigh
The awkward silence: You know the blank stare and “why you have to bring this up again” silence. Or the maybe if I just don’t respond you will stop talking silence.
This shit is made up defense: This is my favorite, people will argue to me that this holiday is made up and therefore we don’t need to celebrate it. Ummmmm, aren’t all holidays made the f up. So, because this was made up in our lifetime means that it isn’t valid?

I met a “real” Native person, or two, or three.

So, in the last 2 years I’ve met and known 3 real Native people. They’ve all looked totally different, had totally different experiences but I met all of them in the course of doing this liberation work.

I think, it might just be getting through my big head that Native people are not the caricatures placed in my mind by years of schooling and living in a White supremacist world.

Thoughts on Native American and Black Solidarity

November is Native American Heritage Month and though I pride myself on being knowledgeable about the histories of people of the African Diaspora, I had to be real with myself, there is still so much I don’t know about the histories of my Native American brothers and sisters. Thinking of the importance of this solidarity led me to explore the topic of Black/Native American resistance.

The Audacity of Action

But then I remembered our trailblazer, Shirley Chisholm. We wrote about her before election day last year. 

She was an audacious woman, who, no matter what she faced decided she was gonna be a straight G.