Who Gon’ Stop Her, Huh?

This award is important for a few reasons:

It honors someone who is moving like a freight train through Hollywood.
The award is named after a song by Jay-Z and pre-sunken place, Kanye.
I made it up and it’s dope.
Because it’s Women’s History Month, this award is recognizing another Black woman favorite of mine and apparently everyone else. Let’s not ignore the elephant in the room or should I say, the last Black unicorn in the room.

La Guarachera de Cuba: Celia Cruz

Cruz recast’s Gloria Gaynor’s famous “you’re not welcome anymore,” heartbreak anthem as a song about resilience and joy in the face of trials. The struggle for freedom, the tears for the friends we leave behind, the perseverance and the love for our people that carries us forward. The ancient song, hands on drums and feet dancing, the blood of our villages that we carry across all borders and barriers, into spaces that do not always love us but where we must love in order to survive.

Kemet Queens: Melissa Harville-Lebron

I made a post on Instagram a few weeks back after hearing Chris Rock on his new Netflix special Tambourine, where he said, “only children and women are loved unconditionally; but men are loved based off of what they can provide.” At the time, more than being funny the line felt true and so considered it fair game to repost. That is until I actually wrapped my brain around the saying and started to unpack it that I realized, what he said was complete and utter BS.

Sorry, These Seats are Reserved for Black Women

I think it would be healthy to end Black history month with a lunch and learn at jobs across the country. On February 28th, there should be a fishbowl activity where Black folks and other people of color sit in the inner circle while White folks sit on the outer circle and just listen for a full hour about the feelings and experiences that we have had just working in their institutions (and this obviously wouldn’t be enough time.) This needs to happen without any backlash from HR and without interruption.

Words of Wisdom from Cardi B. A celebration of Afro-Latinidadness for Black History Month

There is an elegance to being able to capture such complex issues like Afro-Latino identities.  This issue is really as simple as a question on the Living Environment Regents.  I mean, imagine if science teachers taught the unit on genes and punnett squares through the lens of the diaspora; everyone in the room would not only be engaged, but they would know where the hell they came from…like genetically and geographically.  Hell, this quote makes me want to get a science certification just so I can ask the question: “How do Afro-Latino features manifest?” or “Can two white people create a person with African features?”

To My Not-so-little Black Girl…You Are Magic

So this post is dedicated to my first-born and one of my pride and joys, Kaori Nijere Moye. Kaori will be celebrating her 18th birthday in less than a month and we definitely have a lot to celebrate. I’m going to save the schools that she got accepted into until the end but as a proud Black woman, I cannot continue to praise other Black women and leave my successful daughter out of the festivities. I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night- I mean, I would… but not well.

Black Women for President…Yaaaaaasss!

The great thing about Black women is we have all the answers because we not only can identify but we call out all of the real problems. Despite what the media will have you think about Black women, we are nurturers, mothers, thinkers, doers and so much more.