International Women’s Day and the wage gap

Can I be honest?

Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day…just feels so very White to me. I don’t feel nothing…that’s improper grammar right? I don’t feel anything for either of these celebrations. 

Which made me wonder, did any of my teachers out there acknowledge IWD in your classrooms, last week? Have you all been doing anything for Women’s History Month? Do y’all even know the theme for this year IWD, did you know a theme existed?

What Black History Can Teach Us About the Gender Binary

European colonizers met non-binary people advising kings, and being spiritual leaders, warriors, and court eunuchs among nations and tribes as diverse as the Zulu, Buganda, and Amhara. Christianity and Islam coexisted with women warriors, men with long hair and braids, and women marrying each other for convenience and economic stability. The diaspora is no different; there are many examples from Brazil, Haiti, the U.S., and Cuba where African descendants break our normal expectations of men and women.

Amara La Negra and Embracing Afro-Latinxs

The comment sections of these post are filled with people who think like Young Hollywood’s and serve as a reminder of how Latinxs often times ostracize their own and favor fairer skinned children, relatives and actors.

Thoughts on Native American and Black Solidarity

November is Native American Heritage Month and though I pride myself on being knowledgeable about the histories of people of the African Diaspora, I had to be real with myself, there is still so much I don’t know about the histories of my Native American brothers and sisters. Thinking of the importance of this solidarity led me to explore the topic of Black/Native American resistance.