January 1st, 1804: That’s our New Year!

So, I swallowed those tears before returning to the sun shine. But what I could never swallow was my new nickname that followed me for the rest of my time living on that block, every time we walked to the train and every time I got on the cheese bus I heard the kids singing, African or  Haitian Booty Scratcher.

Which had me fucked up.
Because, again, I was Antiguan.

We are the ones we’ve been waiting for: Principles to teach by in 2018

But don’t worry, you won’t have to be patient for too long especially because we will both be on break for the next not quite 2 weeks.

Just like you, we are closing up shop and taking time to be with family and friends over this holiday season. That means:

No daily blogs…But in this last one of 2018 we got a treat!
No Podcasts…did you peep we dropped one today?
No updates on social media….well our social media manager says she’s still gonna be dropping stuff. Thank Goodness for her.

We will be back on January 2nd, refreshed, renewed and ready to take on all that comes our way.

But, we are leaving you with an early Kwanzaa present.

Collective Work and Responsibility

Lots of times when I bring up Kwanzaa to my family and friends, they react in one of a few ways:

The sigh: You know the sigh, it’s the: “not this shit again,” sigh. The: “here you go on that Black shit again.” sigh. Or the: “why you trying to take away Christmas from me?” sigh
The awkward silence: You know the blank stare and “why you have to bring this up again” silence. Or the maybe if I just don’t respond you will stop talking silence.
This shit is made up defense: This is my favorite, people will argue to me that this holiday is made up and therefore we don’t need to celebrate it. Ummmmm, aren’t all holidays made the f up. So, because this was made up in our lifetime means that it isn’t valid?

Moving The Culture Podcast: Decolonizing our Holidays, Relationships and Language Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of Moving The Culture Podcast: Decolonizing our Holidays, Relationships and Language.

What does the repeated experience of discrimination and/or fighting discrimination actually do to your physical and mental health? NPR and NY Times articles.

Should we be talking to the likes of Richard Spencer and who is the “we” we talking about? Gary Younge interviews Richard Spencer

Read the articles from Erin Are we invaders, tourists or guests? and Humblevito Woke Wypipo to understand their love fest with each other and Coates.

I met a “real” Native person, or two, or three.

So, in the last 2 years I’ve met and known 3 real Native people. They’ve all looked totally different, had totally different experiences but I met all of them in the course of doing this liberation work.

I think, it might just be getting through my big head that Native people are not the caricatures placed in my mind by years of schooling and living in a White supremacist world.