The time is now! Don’t be like the NY Times and National Geographic

In looking through the stories of women featured in the Times article, I was angered by realizing that I didn’t know of Ida B. Wells or Henrietta Lacks until college and the way our current curriculums are set up, our students won’t either. I’ve found that when teaching Global History and U.S. History, unless teacher led, the stories of influential women are still absent in our textbooks.

Who Gon’ Stop Her, Huh?

This award is important for a few reasons:

It honors someone who is moving like a freight train through Hollywood.
The award is named after a song by Jay-Z and pre-sunken place, Kanye.
I made it up and it’s dope.
Because it’s Women’s History Month, this award is recognizing another Black woman favorite of mine and apparently everyone else. Let’s not ignore the elephant in the room or should I say, the last Black unicorn in the room.

I get it how I live it: Bad girl Rih Rih

So, I’m jacking their style during our #IssaCelebration month and I’m awarding my, “I get it how I live it Award” to the one and only Robyn Rihanna Fenty.

That’s right. Bad Girl Rih Rih is life!

Artist
Entrepreneur
Philanthropist
Shade Thrower
Professional Black Girl
Beauty, Fashion and Style Icon
And the baddest girl on the block.

I gotta story to tell

Biggie was our inspiration for this session because he was a masterful storyteller and we know that in order to persuade you must become a master of communication; through writing, speaking, imagery, movement. We’ve gone beyond the information age, the New Century student is all about the experiential age.

Moving The Culture Podcast: Hip Hop as Teacher

Welcome to Moving The Culture Podcast: Hip Hop as Teacher
In this episode we discuss Lucas Joyner’s “I’m not a Racist” and the dangers of the ahistorical point of view, particularly when it comes to Culturally Responsive applications of this work in our classrooms. We also discuss Nicki Minaj’s appropriation of Pocahontas and the ways in which Jay-Z is teaching us all how to adult.

I met a “real” Native person, or two, or three.

So, in the last 2 years I’ve met and known 3 real Native people. They’ve all looked totally different, had totally different experiences but I met all of them in the course of doing this liberation work.

I think, it might just be getting through my big head that Native people are not the caricatures placed in my mind by years of schooling and living in a White supremacist world.