Who Gon’ Stop Her, Huh?

This award is important for a few reasons:

It honors someone who is moving like a freight train through Hollywood.
The award is named after a song by Jay-Z and pre-sunken place, Kanye.
I made it up and it’s dope.
Because it’s Women’s History Month, this award is recognizing another Black woman favorite of mine and apparently everyone else. Let’s not ignore the elephant in the room or should I say, the last Black unicorn in the room.

International Women’s Day and the wage gap

Can I be honest?

Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day…just feels so very White to me. I don’t feel nothing…that’s improper grammar right? I don’t feel anything for either of these celebrations. 

Which made me wonder, did any of my teachers out there acknowledge IWD in your classrooms, last week? Have you all been doing anything for Women’s History Month? Do y’all even know the theme for this year IWD, did you know a theme existed?

What Black History Can Teach Us About the Gender Binary

European colonizers met non-binary people advising kings, and being spiritual leaders, warriors, and court eunuchs among nations and tribes as diverse as the Zulu, Buganda, and Amhara. Christianity and Islam coexisted with women warriors, men with long hair and braids, and women marrying each other for convenience and economic stability. The diaspora is no different; there are many examples from Brazil, Haiti, the U.S., and Cuba where African descendants break our normal expectations of men and women.

Black Brilliance in Farming

As educators, I believe we should empower Black youth and youth of color to take their rightful places in fields related to farming and agriculture. I’ve heard of students going on trips to farms and having great experiences farming because they get to be outdoors, to move around, and feel validated in bringing the knowledge they have about farming to existing environmental spaces. After learning about the ties between racism and food justice, (see this dope article by Soul Fire Co-Director Leah Penniman) Black people have an unmistakable stake in this work and it is crucial to empower our youth to be revolutionary change makers on this front.

The words of a Griot!

It’s refreshing to hear music that is intentionally moving away from some of this contemporary trash we have to deal with. Don’t get me wrong I be loving certain songs when they add to my overall vibe, but I acknowledge the lack of substance in a lot of the records. And while I’m not saying that I only want to listen to this conscious type of rap, I am saying that I appreciate the way in which this can impact our kids.

The Aesthetics of Black Excellence; Celebrating BHM Through Visual Literacy

All content areas require literacy, so I’d encourage educators to access those literacy skills through the visual arts.  Contrasts and contradictions, repetition, imagery and symbolism are tools that help us construct meaning in our world.  The development of these skills is at the heart of critical thinking which makes it possible for us to imagine a different world than the one we live in.  

I’m in awe of Blackness right now.

Let’s share a little of that awe with our students and bring our classrooms to life by looking at our content through the eyes of the great Black artists of our time.